Agencies | Governor
Virginia Regulatory Town Hall
Agency
Department of Corrections
Board
Board of Corrections
chapter
Minimum Standards for Jails and Lockups [6 VAC 15 ‑ 40]
Action Amend Minimum Standards for Jails and Lockups to add requirements on restraint of pregnant offenders
Stage Proposed
Comment Period Ends 9/27/2013
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267 comments

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7/29/13  10:41 am
Commenter: Rev. MichaEl Hirsch

Limiting the use of restraints to assure safety and well being of Mother and Child...
 

I don't need 3000 words, but here's three, LIMIT THE RESTRAINTS!

CommentID: 28645
 

7/29/13  11:15 am
Commenter: Diane Reynolds

Approve new regulations limiting restraints for prisoners giving birth
 

Please support the new regulations that would limit restraints for pregnant women while giving birth. This would provide humane treatment and increased safety for the mother and new baby. Thank you!

CommentID: 28646
 

7/29/13  11:22 am
Commenter: Brian Powell

Restrict the use of restraints on pregnant inmates during labor and delivery.
 

Restrict the use of restraints on pregnant inmates during labor and delivery.  Move towards providing more civilized conditions in jails and correctional facilities for expecting mothers.  Thank you.

CommentID: 28647
 

7/29/13  11:28 am
Commenter: Linda Wall, Read the Walls

Removing Restaints on Women in Prison Giving Birth
 

I am astonished that this is even going on in modern America. This appears to be quite barbaric for a civilized country. I encourage you to lift the restricitons that require restraining a woman in prison during delivery. Just because a person commits a crime, it does not make them an animal. 

CommentID: 28648
 

7/29/13  11:28 am
Commenter: The Family Foundation

Limit the Use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates
 

The Family Foundation commends the Board of Corrections for proposing regulations that will promote the health and well-being of Virginia’s pregnant inmates. The use of restraints on women during labor and delivery is an injustice that has been permitted for far too long. These new policies will serve to protect the lives of both the expecting mother and her unborn child by creating more humane conditions inside our jails and correctional facilities. We encourage the Board to approve these regulations and to continue standing for the dignity of life for all Virginians.

CommentID: 28649
 

7/29/13  11:58 am
Commenter: Milton Heatwole

Limit the Use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates
 
CommentID: 28652
 

7/29/13  12:15 pm
Commenter: Dylan Kennedy

Limit the Use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates
 
In this day and age, women are faced with many surrounding complications throughout their pregnancy and when giving birth. The stress and pain induced by labor already puts women at great risk for additional complications. Let's keep it simple and keep the shackles off during labor.
CommentID: 28653
 

7/29/13  12:32 pm
Commenter: Karen K. Saul

Restrict use of restraints on pregnant inmates during labor and delivery
 

I urge you to provide more civilized conditions in jails and correctional facilities for pregnant mothers. Please restrict the use of restraints on pregnant women during labor and delivery. This will promote the health and well-being of a pregnant mother and her unborn child.  

 

CommentID: 28654
 

7/29/13  1:05 pm
Commenter: Jordan Golmon

Restrict the Restraints on Mothers
 

Please enact new rules that would take the shackles off of mothers who are incarcerated.   These shackles put a physical as well as psychological weight on an expecting mother that's effects can bring much extra stress into what is already a tough situation for any expecting mother.  By taking away these restraints, you are helping harmless mothers get much needed relief from extra burdens.  This will be a very humane and much appreciated route to take.

CommentID: 28655
 

7/29/13  1:14 pm
Commenter: Marci Meeks with the Family Foundation

Women shackled during labor and delivery
 

I had no idea of this was normal practice for women having children while incarcerated.  I agree with those who have spoken for the shackles to be removed during labor and delivery and hope you act on the side of compassion for these women and remove the shackles during labor and delivery.

CommentID: 28656
 

7/29/13  1:41 pm
Commenter: James K Disney

Limit restraints on Women at time of delivery.
 

I am concerned about the woman, the child and those attending to the birth of the child. The shackling of a woman in labor appears to be overreach on the part of the Department of Corrections. There must have been incidents that led to the passing of laws that allow shackling. On the other hand there must be other ways of dealing with the woman other than shackling. I would like to thank the correction officials for what is so often a thankless job, but would encourage preparations that would make shackling a procedure that is no longer practiced in Virginia. Thank you.PR

CommentID: 28657
 

7/29/13  1:48 pm
Commenter: Marylou Bergeron

Limit the Restraints
 

Childbirth is difficlut enough without being shackled.  Let's show some humanity.  Please vote to limit the restraints on women in labor.

CommentID: 28658
 

7/29/13  1:57 pm
Commenter: Cheryl Hair

restraints on pregnant inmates
 

I commend you for thinking of the health & safety of pregnant inmates, and their babies. Having a woman in restraints during labor & delivery can endanger the mother and/or the baby. Please change this policy, so that the mothers and babies will have every oppotunity for a safe delivery. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Mrs. Cheryl Hair

CommentID: 28659
 

7/29/13  2:15 pm
Commenter: Maxime Devilliers

Cruel and Unusual
 

CommentID: 28660
 

7/29/13  2:15 pm
Commenter: Roselle D. Clark

Restraints on pregnant inmates
 
  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.
  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.
CommentID: 28661
 

7/29/13  2:17 pm
Commenter: Earl & Ellie Gudeman

Restraints on pregnant inmates
 

Childbirth is difficlut enough without being shackled.   Please vote to limit the restraints on women in labor.

CommentID: 28662
 

7/29/13  2:18 pm
Commenter: Connie Buttimer

Limit restraints on pregnant inmates
 

Restraining inmates who are in labor/delivery is cruel and unusual punishment.

CommentID: 28663
 

7/29/13  2:26 pm
Commenter: Karen Fedorov

No pregnant woman should be restrained during labor and delivery
 

To Whom It May Concern:

  I used to be a labor and delivery nurse and was appalled to learn of the practice of restraining women during labor and delivery.  For that reason:

  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.

Sincerely,

Karen Fedorov

 

CommentID: 28664
 

7/29/13  2:36 pm
Commenter: Tris Harmon ,PRAYUSA

restraints on mother in jail in delivery
 

Have compassion on mother and child -please no restraints

CommentID: 28665
 

7/29/13  2:39 pm
Commenter: Ellen O'Connor

Modification of restraints on pregnant inmates
 

Please enact the modification of restraints on pregnant inmates. This is a merciful and important change to how the correctional system deals with its inmates.  Steps toward greater humanity to those in prison or jail should be taken wherever possible.

Thank you for your consideration of my views on this issue.

CommentID: 28666
 

7/29/13  2:41 pm
Commenter: Scott Christian, Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy

Regulations concerning restraining pregnant inmates before, during, and after birth
 

Please do what is right by these women and their children-to-be.  National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.

CommentID: 28667
 

7/29/13  2:49 pm
Commenter: Jean K. Tunstall

New regulations for pregnant inmates
 

Type over this text and enter your comments here. You are li

  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.
  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.

mited to approximately 3000 words.

CommentID: 28668
 

7/29/13  2:53 pm
Commenter: Frank Blechman

Restraint of Prisoners in Virginia, Adopt new Rules
 

Reading about policies in Virginia prisons I wonder if correction officials have completely lost track of what we are trying to accomplish by temporarily isolating individuals from society.  As I understand the theory, we have two goals:

1.  Prevent harm to others

2.  Provide the individual opportunities to find more productive ways to live their life.

A general principle of restraining pregnant inmates seems to me to serve neither of these goals.  New rules should make restraint a rare exception to the norm.  I commend the Officials who have proposed new more humane rules.  I urge their adoption.

CommentID: 28669
 

7/29/13  2:59 pm
Commenter: Stanley Naimon

New Regulations Limiting the use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates in Virginia
 
  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  •  
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.
  •  
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
CommentID: 28670
 

7/29/13  3:02 pm
Commenter: Healthy Kids Campaign

Restraining Pregnant Women
 

I am so glad to see new legislation , please accept the new suggested guidelines

CommentID: 28671
 

7/29/13  3:04 pm
Commenter: Mary Ellen D'Agostino SALT Social Action Linking Together

Anti-shackling of women before, during and after child birth in State prisons and Jails
 

It has been my priviledge and responsibility to be present in about a year's timeframe of discussiona dealing with the anti shackling question in VA. Often present at these discussions were the Director of Corrections, Clark, the prison physician, wardens, Sen, Patrick  Hope and other officials and representatives of civic organizations. Input from data collected from the prisons, other similar state facilities in the country, medical reports and prisoner remarks provided statistical information guiding the Board to come to the conclusion that this form of "cruel and unusual punishment" is not warranted. VA is publicly known as a good state for businesses. Let us now add that it is also a state that considers  huminitarian treatment of special health needs of incarcerated individuals  as an important aspect of public health. The organization I represent at this juncture, SALT's thousand plus members ,highly support eliminating shackling before, during and after childbirth as  a mandate in jails and State prisons.

CommentID: 28672
 

7/29/13  3:11 pm
Commenter: Ruth Twiggs

Restraints on pregnant and/or prisoners delivering
 

When I first learned of this about 3 years ago, I was beyond shocked.  How could this be happening?  Of course, no one I talked to in the general public even knew it was happening.  Total disrespect for women!

I applaud the legislators and the other caring individuals and organizations who worked tirelessly to see this barbaric practice stopped.  I hope as I read through the new regulations that they will be applied and that there will be stringent  oversight to see that they are.

Thanks to all who perservered.

We do care.

 

 

 

CommentID: 28673
 

7/29/13  3:21 pm
Commenter: Sara Gann

New Regulations Limiting the Use of Restraint on Pregnant Inmates
 
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • ?National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.

 

CommentID: 28674
 

7/29/13  3:28 pm
Commenter: Anne Zieger

Cruel and unusual punishment
 

National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.

CommentID: 28675
 

7/29/13  3:36 pm
Commenter: Eugene and Joan Kelly

Minimum Standards for Jails and Lockups [6 VAC 15 ? 40]
 

We commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. We thank the Board for implementing this compassionate and commonsense policy to protect the health and well-being of mothers and their unborn children.  We urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final and to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.

CommentID: 28676
 

7/29/13  3:39 pm
Commenter: Felix Gostel

New regulations for restraining pregnant inmates
 
Thank you for approving the new regulations concerning restraining pregnant inmates.
CommentID: 28677
 

7/29/13  3:45 pm
Commenter: Ann Hess, member Evangelical Lutheran Church of America

Thank you for common sense regulations for pregnant and postpartum women
 

Thank you for the proposed revised regulations to provide safe and humane treatment of women and protection for their unborn or recently born children.  Please add opportunities for public oversight to insure protection and implimentation of these regulations.

CommentID: 28678
 

7/29/13  4:31 pm
Commenter: Cathy Walker, Concerned Citizen

Support Proposed Regs Limiting Use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates!
 
  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.  Transparency and accountability matter!
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane. Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights. 
  • We have enough unconstitutional issues facing this country.  Virginia should set an example for other states and lead the way - let's not become Florida!
CommentID: 28682
 

7/29/13  4:31 pm
Commenter: Rev. Bill Cashman

Pregnant Inmates
 

After watching my wife give birth to our three children, I can't imagine the difficuliy that would have been added if she had been in restraints.  It seems not only good common sense to not restrain her while giving birth, but it also seems that it would be healthier for she and the baby as "mom" can reposition herself when necessary to "push" and move about to help the baby be born.

She has enough problems because she is incarcerated lets don't add to her burden!

CommentID: 28683
 

7/29/13  4:38 pm
Commenter: Mary Ann Rehnke

Limiting Use of Restraints with Pregnant Inmates
 

CommentID: 28684
 

7/29/13  4:55 pm
Commenter: Louantha Kerr

No restraints
 

National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.

CommentID: 28685
 

7/29/13  5:20 pm
Commenter: April Cahill

It is ridiculous to have women restrained during child birth!
 

CommentID: 28686
 

7/29/13  5:37 pm
Commenter: Susan F Kaufman

Severely Restrict the use of Restraint on Pregnant Women
 

The Board of Corrections are heroic in their proposed limits on restraints on pregnant women.  The use of restraints during labor, delivery and postpartum are cruel, unnecessary, and psychologically harmful to women.  Technology has made other options of tracking inmates possible, and much less problematicshould a medical emergency arise.  Very few female prisoners are violent and are little security risk.  There are no statistics of inmates endangering themselves or others during labor and postpartum.  They are not a flight risk.  The Board of Corrections is well supported in this decision for the wellbeing of everyone involved.

I would like to take the opportunity to urge the Board to make strong provisions for publicly reporting of the new regulations as well as compliance with these regulations.  This addition would make it more likely that public support of this measure will be expressed in a timely fashion.

Thank you again for this positive and compassionate change.

CommentID: 28687
 

7/29/13  6:09 pm
Commenter: Martha Knight

Restraints pregnant women inmates
 

I find using restraints on pregnant women inmates to be barbaric and offensive. Such use of restraints offends me as a woman and a woman of faith.

CommentID: 28688
 

7/29/13  6:11 pm
Commenter: Michael N Getsi

Use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates.
 

I encourage the board to severly restrict the use of restraints on pregnant inmates since they can harm both the mother and the baby.  Governor McDonnell's proposed regulations should be adopted.  

CommentID: 28689
 

7/29/13  7:28 pm
Commenter: Garry Lautenschlager

Restraints during Childbirth
 

I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.

CommentID: 28691
 

7/29/13  7:40 pm
Commenter: geo a.

im opposed
 

im opposed to the restraints

CommentID: 28693
 

7/29/13  8:23 pm
Commenter: Steven Kranowski

Limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates.
 

To Whom it May Concern:

 

I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.

Furthermore, I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.

This is important because restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.

Moreover, freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.

The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.

National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.

It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.

I strongly urge you to do the right thing.  Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Steven Kranowski

CommentID: 28695
 

7/29/13  9:27 pm
Commenter: James E. Burke, Arlington Interfaith Council; Virginia Interfaith Center

Comments on shackling policy
 

Thank you for the opportunity to comment.

The Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates is just and proper. The Board is to be commended for implementing a compassionate, commonsense policy, and should take the action to make these proposed regulations final.
Right now, the proposed regulations fall short in providing meaningful oversight through public reporting. As part of the final regulation, the Board should include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.

I believe that the Board understands the unjust and even barbaric aspects of restraining mothers in birth:
-Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the mother and her child. In addition to being dangerous and inhumane, restraints increases the potential for accidents and harm to the mother and the child. During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can complicate medical care and can retard recovery of the mother and her newborn.
Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.

Thank you for your compassion in moving towards a more just, humane policy that encourages one of life's most sacred events to be free from artificial constraints that could harm the mother and child.

CommentID: 28696
 

7/29/13  9:57 pm
Commenter: RBH Enterprises

Thanks & God Bless
 

Thank you for loking out for these mothers and their babies:-)).  

CommentID: 28697
 

7/29/13  9:59 pm
Commenter: Martha Desrosiers

Restraints of Female Prisoners during pregnancy
 

Good evening,

  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.
  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy.Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery. Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.

Thank you.

CommentID: 28698
 

7/29/13  10:00 pm
Commenter: Erica Bettwy

Limit and Ensure Compliance with the use of restraints on pregnant inmates
 
  • I commend the Board of Corrections’ approval of proposed regulations limiting the use of restraints on pregnant inmates. I thank the Board for implementing a compassionate and commonsense policy, and urge the Board to make these proposed regulations final.
  • I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting.
  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights.
CommentID: 28699
 

7/30/13  1:21 am
Commenter: Marilyn Martucci

New Regulations Limiting the use of Restraints on Pregnant Inmates in Virginia
 

 


Thank you for implementing a compassionate and common sense policy, and I urge the Board to finalize the following proposed regulations I fully support:

I urge the Board of Corrections to include a strong public reporting requirement in the regulations to ensure accountability for and compliance with the regulations.  Right now, the proposed regulations do not provide meaningful oversight through public reporting. This a flaw which must be corrected.

  • Restraining a pregnant woman can pose undue health risks to the woman and her pregnancy. Restraining pregnant women is dangerous and inhumane.  Restraining pregnant inmates increases their chances of accidentally tripping or falling, and harming their pregnancies.  During labor and postpartum recovery, restraints can interfere with appropriate medical care and can be detrimental to the health of the woman and her newborn child.
  • Freedom from physical restraints is especially critical during labor, delivery, and during postpartum recovery.  Women often need to move around during labor and recovery, including moving their legs as part of the birthing process.  Restraints on a pregnant woman can interfere with the medical staff’s ability to appropriately assist in childbirth or to conduct emergency procedures. Following birth, it is critical for a woman to remain unrestrained to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Freedom from restraints after delivery also fosters postpartum bonding between a mother and her newborn, which is essential to the healthy development of the child.
  • The vast majority of female prisoners are non-violent offenders who pose a low security risk—particularly during labor and postpartum recovery.  In the states that have outlawed restraint of pregnant inmates, there have been no documented instances of a woman in labor or delivery escaping or causing harm to themselves, security guards, or medical staff.
  • National correctional and medical associations oppose the restraint of pregnant women because it is unnecessary and harmful to a woman and her pregnancy. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshal Service, the American Correctional Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association have recognized that restraining women during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery is unnecessary and dangerous to a woman’s health and well being and may harm her child.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment to restrain a pregnant woman during labor and delivery.  Restraining a woman during labor demonstrates a deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical needs, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, running counter to long-established Supreme Court precedent protecting prisoners’ constitutional rights
CommentID: 28703
 

7/30/13  6:15 am
Commenter: anne barriault, independent writer-editor

new regulations regarding limiting restraints of pregnant female prisoners
 

I support the compassionate and commonsense efforts to limit, if not overrule, the use of restraints for female prisoners during childbirth. Thank you.

CommentID: 28704